Foreign Divorce | Divorce Lawyer Long Island

Will a foreign divorce be recognized in the state of New York?  The first question that must be answered is what is a foreign divorce?  A foreign divorce is one granted from another state in the union or another country.  With respect to divorces from a sister state, under full faith and credit clause of the U.S. Constitution, New York will give grant full faith and credit to judgments from sister states. What if the judgment came from another country?  That was the issue presented to the Court in Ahmad v Khalil.

In this case, the parties were married in Jordan.  After two years, they moved to New York.  After approximately eight years, the mother moved back to Jordan with the children.  Father continued to provide financial support to his family.  A court in Jordan granted the Wife’s petition for divorce.  That divorce action dissolved the marriage but did not address issues relating to child support and distribution of assets.  The Husband commenced an action in Jordan relating to the custody of the children.  The Wife then starts an action in New York, seeking maintenance and child support.

Courts will generally accord recognition to the judgments rendered in a foreign country under the doctrine of comity which is the equivalent of full faith and credit given by the Courts to judgments of sister states.   Absent a showing of fraud or some showing that recognizing a divorce from a foreign state would be against some strong public policy.  With respect to public policy, this exception is rarely used and only considered when the divorce in the foreign country is counter to fundamental notions of what is decent and just.  Therefore, for a court to refuse full recognition to a lawful foreign judgment, it must be demonstrated that he decree violates some fundamental principle of justice, some prevalent conception of good morals or some deep-rooted tradition of the common good.  Essentially, Courts will generally look to validate and enforce foreign judgments.

In this case, the Wife attempted to set aside the Jordanian divorce decree by arguing a lack of due process.  She argued that in Jordan, a husband is allowed to obtain a divorce unilaterally without notice or consent of the wife.  The Court did not give much credit to this argument.  It appears that the wife actually started the divorce in Jordan and then withdrew her action there when she discovered that it was to her financial best interests to obtain a divorce decree in the State of New York.   Thus, the Court recognized the Jordanian divorce.

Though the divorce decree was recognized by the Court, there was martial property that was located in New York.  The Court allowed the wife to litigated the issue regarding the equitable distribution of the New York property as this court would be the most convenient court to hear this matter.  The Court declined to hear issues related to child support, maintenance and distribution of property in Jordan.  The Court reasoned that the children had lived and current live in Jordan.  There is Jordanian property to be disposed of and there are procedures in Jordan which the wife can avail herself to address these issues.

When faced with a foreign divorce, the going in position of the Courts will be that the divorce will be enforced absent a showing of fraud in the procurement of said divorce.  If your spouse comes home one day and announces that you have been divorced through a judgment from another country, see us immediately.  Typically we see this issue arise from divorce decrees granted in the Dominican Republic.  Swift motion practice will be needed to protect your rights.

Equitable Distribution Isn’t Necessarily Equitable Distribution

Many people believe that when you get divorced, especially after a long term marriage, your assets are split equally.  This is not true.  New York is an equitable distribution state, meaning that equity, or fairness, will decide how assets are to be split.  Who determines what’s fair or equitable? Well if the parties cannot amicably settle their dispute and come up with an accommodation between them, the Court will make that determination.   If you leave it to the Court, you may or may not get what you deem is appropriate at the parties in Cornish v. Cornish recently discovered.

The parties in the Cornish matter were married in 1991 with three children.  The wife was the monied spouse in this case and the husband was awarded, amongst other things, 30% of his wife’s pension, vice 50%.  He was also awarded 50% of the parties credit card debt.   The husband appeals seeking to modify the trial Court’s ruling increasing his share of the wife’s pension to 50%.  The first thing the husband needed to realize is that the Courts are accorded substantial deference in determining what distribution of the marital property is equitable.  Note the equitable standard which is based upon considerations of fairness and the respective situations of the parties.

The trial Court looked at the marriage.  Here, the husband was a stay at home father.  However, as the wife testified, the once the children reached school age, the wife implored the husband to find employment, which he declined despite the financial difficulties the family faced.  In addition to his refusal to earn a living and contribute financially to the family, it was ascertained that husband was an alcoholic and his alcoholism was contributing to his ability to find employment.  Additionally, the husband had inherited money.  Instead of using this money to assist the family, the Court found that he wasted his inheritance and in a few short months, it was gone.  Finally, the Court did not find the husband’s testimony regarding his job search credible.  Thus the Court, taking all of this into consideration, believed it was only fair that 30% of the pension go to the husband vice 50%.

In the same vein, the Court determined that the family’s finances were compromised by their use of credit cards to pay for family expenses.  However, the Court also found that the credit card was not only used for daily expenses, but that the husband used the cards for unnecessary expenses unduly burdening the already precarious family financial picture.  As a result, the Court awarded half of the debt to the husband.

Your behavior during the marriage is important when it comes to equitable distribution.  Keep in mind that marital property is divided between the parties and that not only will the Court divide property/assets, it will also divide liabilities. If you have a spouse, like in this case, who is wasting marital assets coupled with refusing to contribute to the marriage, the Court will take that into consideration when determining how to fashion an equitable distribution award.

Joint Custody & Child Support in New York

Happy Children Playing Kids

Happy Children Playing Kids (Photo credit: epSos.de)

Amongst the hardest things to deal with when getting divorced is providing for the best interests of any children of the marriage.  What some parents immediately think about is child support. The parent who is deemed to be the residential parent is the parent entitled to child support.  While that is easy enough to understand, it becomes tricky when both parents are residential parents, i.e. the children live with both parents exactly fifty percent of the time.  Many parents do this under the misconception that if they split the children exactly fifty percent of the time, child support will not be an issue.  This is not true as the parties in Leonard v. Leonard, found out in June of 2013.

The parties began an action for divorce and the issue revolved around child support.  The father was granted sole legal custody of the children.  This means, that while the parties should endeavor to consult each other regarding major decisions affecting the children, in the event the parties cannot agree, the father is the one who has final decision making authority.  Despite this determination, the parties were granted joint residential custody of the children.  The custody arrangement called for the children to spend exactly half the time with the father, and half the time with the mother.  Father earned approximately $134,000.00 a year and the mother earned approximately $14,000.00 a year, though the court imputed $25,000.00 a year income on the mother.

It is well settled that in a shared residency arrangement, where neither party has the children for the majority of the time, the party with the higher income is deemed to be the noncustodial parent for purposes of child support.  Thus, the father, who made more money, was ordered to pay child support to the mother.  Here is the rational that the law relies on.  An award of child support will best ensure that the children of the marriage will receive the maximum benefit of their parents resources and continue to enjoy, as close as possible, their pre divorce standard of living.  In other words, the Court wants to ensure that the children can enjoy living with both parents as much as possible.

When dealing with custody of your children, people often think about joint custody, sole custody, shared custody and child support.  Here is a simple way to think about these complex issues.  First and foremost, where are your children going to sleep?  Both parents generally want to be the residential/custodial parent, i.e. the parent where the kids will reside.    The benefits of being declared the residential/custodial parent include, having your children live with you, final decision making authority, and child support.   Amazingly, child support is a battle.  It is simply amazing the amount of cases where the issue is simply the payment child support.  One way people try and avoid this is to split the children equally.  As we have seen, this is a misguided approach to avoiding child support.  First and foremost, it requires the children to move from parent to parent practically every week.  Once the children are school aged, this may not be in their best interest.  Additionally, you need to consider whether avoiding or getting child support by disrupting your children’s schedule is what’s best for them.  In all likelihood, it is not.  Considering custody in a divorce and need help? Call a Long Island divorce lawyer at Divins & Divins, P.C., for a free consultation and we’ll help resolve all of your questions and concerns.

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Grandparents Rights to Visitation | Long Island Divorce Lawyer

If you are a grandparent, what rights do you have to visit your grandchildren?  Can you get a Court to grant you visitation with your grandchildren if the parents forbid it?  The Court of Appeals for New York addressed this issue in its decision of In the Matter of E.S. v. P.D., in 2007.

In that case, husband and wife were married and had one child. Unfortunately, the wife was diagnosed with cancer.  When the diagnosis was made, wife’s mother moved in to help her daughter with daily errands and other things like cooking, cleaning and caring for the couple’s son. The wife passed away and the decision was made that the grandmother would stay in the house to help raise the child while husband worked.  For the next five years, the grandmother helped raise the child.  At some point, arguments between the father and grandmother began regarding the best way to raise the child.  As a result, the father asked the grandmother to leave and severely curtailed the visitation between the child and his grandmother.  As visitation became less and less frequent, grandmother petitioned the Court for visitation.  The father’s position was that the grandmother was not raising his son the way he deemed fit and was usurping his role as the father.

Domestic Relations Law §72(1) states that where either or both of the parents of a minor child, residing within this state, is or are deceased, or where circumstances show that conditions exist which equity would see fit to intervene, a grandparent may apply to the supreme or family court, and the court, by order after due notice to the parent or any other person or party having the care, custody, and control of such child, to be given  in such manner as the Court shall prescribe, may make such directions as the best interest of the child may require, for visitation rights for such grandparent in respect to that child.

When a Court is faced with a petition from a grandparent requesting visitation, it first must find that the grandparent has standing to come into court in the first place.  There is no automatic right for a grandparent to see their grandchild.  The Domestic Relations Law only provides a vehicle for a grandparent to seek visitation.  In order for a grandparent to have standing the Court must find one of two things exist.  First, if one of the two parents has passed away, then the grandparents have standing.  The other test is a more of a catch all which states that the grandparents have shown equitable circumstances which dictate that they should at least be heard as to why they should have access to their grandchild.

In this case, since a parent passed away, the grandmother had standing and was able to petition the Court for visitation.  Based on the facts in this case, specifically a five year relationship with the child where the grandmother was assisting in raising the child, the Court held that it was in the child’s best interests to continue this close relationship with the child.  Despite this ruling, the Court was mindful of the father’s wishes and right to raise his son in a manner which he deemed proper. However, in this case, the Court found that the fights and other allegations in which the father leveled against the grandmother were unsubstantiated.

In the circumstance where both parents are alive, the grandparents have a harder time establishing standing.  In order to have standing when both parents are alive, the grandparent would have to show that equity dictates that they be heard in Court.  What should a grandparent be able to show? Their best bet is to establish a long and close bond with the grandchild.  The fact that there is an acrimonious relationship between the parents and the grandparents are not enough to establish or deny visitation.  The key will be the relationship between the grandparent and the child before visitation is curtailed or denied.  Even if you are able to establish standing, grandparents normally have a high hurdle to overcome in forcing visitation.  The parental right to make decisions for their children and raise them in a manner they deem fit is paramount to raising children and will not be lightly disregarded.

Grandparent visitation is a complicated matter which should not be entered into lightly.  Your case will depend on the facts and circumstances of your particular case.  Assuming you have standing, preparing for the hearing is crucial.  If you cannot amicably settle this matter and must seek judicial intervention regarding grandparent visitation, seek our advice from one of our Divorce attorneys at the Long Island Divorce Law Firm of Divins & Divins, P.C., immediately so that we can begin preparing your case for the best possible outcome.

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Equitable Distribution of Veterans Disability and Social Security Benefits

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(Photo credit: bfishadow)

An undecided question in the Second Department (covering Nassau and Suffolk Counties) is how to distribute benefits earned by a military member. The departments are split on this issue and the Court of Appeals, the highest court in New York, has yet to definitively rule.

The fourth department has held that while disability benefits obtained from other sources may be considered for purposes of maintenance, veteran’s disability payments are precluded from consideration. 10 U.S.C. § 1408. The third department held the opposite, stating that veterans benefits can be considered when deciding on equitable distribution. With respect to social security benefits, it is well settled that Social Security Disability Benefits are separate property and are not subject to equitable distribution. DRL § 236(B)(1)(d)(2); Miceli v. Miceli, 78 AD3d 1023 (2d Dept.2010). However, Social Security Disability Benefits, unlike veteran’s disability benefits, are to be considered by the Court when determining a payor spouses ability to pay maintenance.

In Alvarado v. Alvardo, a case decided January 15, 2013, the trial court in Richmond county, dealt with the issue of what should happen to veteran’s and social security benefits. Mr. Alvarado, served in the U.S. Marines from 1965-1969. As a result of his service, he was awarded veterans benefits. The parties were married in 1980 and now seek to dissolve the marriage. Ms. Alvardo seeks to have her husband’s veteran’s benefits as well as the social security he is entitled considered part of the marital property for equitable distribution purposes.

The easier issue is that of the Social Security benefits. Clearly, the benefits he gains from social security will not be considered for purposes of equitable distribution, however, if the Court were to deem maintenance appropriate, the Court will consider the husbands benefits as part of his income when determining his ability to pay maintenance. Addressing veterans benefits, a topic which is hotly contested, the Court held that absent a contractual agreement otherwise, veteran’s benefits are not to be considered when distributing assets as part of equitable distribution.

In addition to the vague guidance given by the Courts regarding this issue, if you are military member, you are entitled to many benefits which civilian courts are not accustomed to seeing. BAH, OHA, special pays etc. will be foreign concepts to most Courts. If you are a military member and are proceeding with a divorce in New York, be sure your attorney is prepared to explain all of these benefits so that you are not being held responsible for monies that you are not actually receving.

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Filing For Divorce: On The Grounds of Adultery


With the passage of “no fault divorce”, New Yorkers rarely need to rely on other grounds for divorce. Invariably, I have clients who want to file for divorce based on adultery. Adultery is defined as the voluntary commission of an act of sexual intercourse or oral sexual conduct with someone other than your spouse. Thus an act of sex with someone other than your spouse qualifies as grounds for divorce. Technically, Adultery is a crime. See Penal Law §255.7 where in a person is guilty of adultery if he/she engages in sexual intercourse with another person while married. Adultery is a Class B misdemeanor. This crime is rarely, if every prosecuted.

If you want to file for divorce using adultery as the basis, consider how you intend on proving your case. As most affairs are usually conducted in secret, your case may need to be made on circumstantial evidence, i.e. proof of opportunity, inclination and intent. Not an easy road to travel. What constitutes good proof? Eye witness testimony from a private investigator or another person who can be a witness to the sexual conduct between the cheating spouse. A spouse’s confession can also be used as evidence however there are some caveats to this. First, this confession must be corroborated. If the confession was made to you, that may not be enough. Your credibility will be tested during cross examination. Thus, I advise that you obtain other forms of evidence along with your spouse’s statements. In addition, you cannot force a spouse to testify. Remember, the burden to prove adultery is on the moving party. You will need to prove your case with clear and convincing evidence.

There are defenses to adultery that you should be aware. They are: (1) the offense was committed by the procurement or connivance of the other spouse; (2) You forgave the cheating spouse, which can be established by the voluntary cohabitation of the parties with the knowledge of the fact (though in today’s economic times, an argument can be made that despite knowing about the adultery, the economics would not allow one party to move out of the marital estate. I have a few clients who remain living together pending the outcome of the divorce as they simply cannot afford to move out of the house. A word of caution, if you engage in sexual intercourse while living together after the discovery of adultery, then the court might take that as proof that you have forgiven your spouse); (3) the offense happened more than five years ago, in other words, you have five years from the discovery of the adultery to bring an action and (4) where the cheating party is entitled to a divorce as a result of your adultery. In other words, you cheated on your spouse and had they filed for divorce upon discovery they would have been entitled to divorce on the grounds of adultery, then neither of you might be entitled to a divorce based on adultery.

Finally, adultery, generally, has no bearing in equitable distribution of the marriage. It is also not a factor in the determination of maintenance. Thus, I end where I began, there really isn’t an advantage in filing for divorce based on the grounds of adultery. You derive no strategic advantage in your case plus, proving adultery may be more difficult than you may have originally thought.

LEARNING POINT: If you insist on filing for divorce based on adultery, be sure you have the proper evidence lined up. Consult us immediately to begin preparing your case. Keep in mind, even if we are able to prove the adultery, it will have little to no bearing on equitable distribution and/or a maintenance award.

Modification Of Child Support


As a general proposition, child support can be modified either upward or downward, only if an unreasonable or unanticipated change in circumstances has occurred. The primary concern with regards to child support is the best interest of the children in question. Thus, even if there is a Court order, either in the form of a separation agreement which was merged into an order, or simply an order regarding child support, a parent can petition the Court for a modification. When considering whether to modify child support, the Court will consider the assets, earnings and obligations of the supporting spouse as well as the financial status of the custodial spouse. Unless there has been an unanticipated and unreasonable change in circumstances, the Court will not change the support order. Factors to be considered by the Court include whether increases of expenses were foreseeable at the time the Court originally made the support order. If the expenses were foreseeable at the time the order was decided and the Court deems that the order was fair and equitable at the time the order was made, you may not get a modification.

What will the Court use to determine if a modification is appropriate? The Court will look to: (1) whether the increased needs of the children are due to special circumstances or to the additional activities of growing children; (2) whether there is an increased cost of living which results in a greater expense for the children; (3) was there a loss of income or assets by a parent or substantial improvement of the financial condition of a parent; and (4) the current and prior life styles of the children. If after the Court considers these factors, it deems that there should be a modification of child support, the Court will utilize the Child Support Standards Act to calculate the appropriate level of child support, and whether there should be a deviation of said support. A downward modification of child support is carefully scrutinized since the primary concern is the best interests of the children. Thus, if you are attempting a downward modification, you must show an unanticipated and unreasonable change in circumstances otherwise the court will in all likelihood deny your request.

Word of caution: If you lost your job through no fault of your own, i.e. you were terminated as a result of cut backs, or your boss simply let you go, the Court will take that into consideration when calculating child support. If however, you purposefully lost your job, i.e. you quit or you took another job to lower your income and thus lower your child support payments, the Court may impute income to you. In other words, you were making $100,000.00 and you quit your job and now you are making $50,000.00. If the Court determines that you did this to lower your child support obligations, the Court may award child support award based on the $100,000.00 salary regardless of what you are currently earning. The key determination surrounding your loss of income will be how it happened. If you simply quit your job or, as in a recent case of mine, decided to follow your passion and embarked on a new career, one that decreased your salary by $40,000.00, the Court may not grant your modification request.

Learning Point: Modification of child support will be considered keeping the best interest of the children in the forefront of the Court’s mind. Adequate preparation in showing the Court that there has been a significant change in circumstances warranting the Court to modify a current order providing for child support. A downward modification will be given close scrutiny. Preparation and presentation will be crucial in your attempts to convince a Court to modify your current child support order.

New York Child Support Guidelines


In 1989, New York passed the Child Support Standards Act (CSSA). The main purpose of this legislation was to establish minimum and meaningful standards of obligations on the premise that both parents share the responsibilities for child support. The CSSA brings a sense of uniformity and predictability with child support. Child support can be generally defined as the amount of money to be paid for the care, maintenance and education of an un-emancipated child.

NY defines basic child support as the sum derived by the application of the child support guidelines formula, as increased by obligations for health, child care and education expenses. So what does all that mean? Basic child support is the regular periodic payment of support made by the noncustodial parent to the custodial parent, which payment is inclusive of the noncustodial parent’s obligations for all the child’s needs except for health care, child care, and educational expenses. The obligations for health care, child care, and educational expenses are commonly referred to as “add-ons.”

The question clients often ask is how much can I expect to pay or receive in child support? The procedure required by the guidelines which the Court will abide is as follows: First the Court will combine both parents income. A base line is used which has been recently changed. The base line was $80,000.00 however has been changed to $136,000.00. In other words, the incomes will be combined but the Court will use $136,000.00 as a baseline in its calculations in the event the combination of salaries is greater than $136,000.00 (I will discuss what happens if the combined salary exceeds $136,000.00 later).

Once the salaries are combined, that number is multiplied by the statutory percentage which is a function of how many children there are in the marriage. (The percentages are: 17% for one child; 25% for two; 29% for three; 31% for four; 35% for five or more however, the Court has discretion when setting the percentage for five or more children.) Once this number is determined, the amount of child support is then apportioned between the parents on a pro rata basis. Under the guideline, the only payment that is made is made by the noncustodial parent.

In the event that the combined salaries are greater than $136,000.00, the Court will use the same calculation but the Court will then decide whether an additional award based on the increased income available. All calculations, regardless of income will be based on the parties’ most recent tax return. The starting point is the gross income minus FICA. If the paying spouse is also required to pay maintenance, then maintenance is subtracted from the gross salary.

Under the CSSA, the Court is to base its calculations on the parties’ tax returns and not on its estimate or approximation as to what the parties’ incomes are. The most recent tax return is the starting point of the child support calculations. If the parties filed joint tax returns, each party must prepare a form, sworn to under the penalty of perjury, disclosing his or her gross individual income. The Court is authorized to look to the amount that a party should have been or should be reported. Distributions from pension and profit sharing plans are reportable as income on tax returns, and thus will be treated as income for CSSA purposes. Maintenance is to be deducted from the noncustodial parent’s income.

What happens if the CSSA brings you below the poverty level? Where that happens, the basic child support obligation is $25 per month or the difference between the non-custodial parents’ income and the federal self-support reserve, whichever is greater. If the non-custodial income would be reduced below the self-support reserve, but not below the poverty level, then the basic child support obligation is to be $50.00 a month or the difference between the non-custodial parents’ income and the self-support reserve, whichever is greater.

LEARNING POINT: While the guidelines are a helpful tool in figuring out child support, this is only the beginning. Add-ons, such as health care, college, child care and the like must also be factored in. Maintenance, if not permanent will change the amount paid in child support. If you are ordered to pay child support through twenty-one years of age, you may get credit for room and board fees you pay to a college which will lower your child support obligations. Seek out an attorney to assist you in determining the appropriate amount of child support.

What Is Child Support?

what is child support?

Child support can be generally defined as the amount of money to be paid for the care, maintenance and education of an un-emancipated child. NY defines basic child support as the sum derived by the application of the child support guidelines formula, as increased by obligations for health, child care and education expenses. So what does all that mean? Basic child support is the regular periodic payment of support made by the noncustodial parent to the custodial parent, which payment is inclusive of the noncustodial parent’s obligations for all the child’s needs except for health care, child care, and educational expenses. The obligations for health care, child care, and educational expenses are commonly referred to as “add-ons.”

The question clients often ask is how much can I expect to pay or receive in child support? The procedure required by the guidelines which the Court will abide is as follows: First the Court will combine both parents income. A base line is used which has been recently changed. The base line was $80,000.00 however has been changed to $136,000.00. In other words, the incomes will be combined but the Court will use $136,000.00 as a baseline in its calculations in the event the combination of salaries is greater than $136,000.00 (I will discuss what happens if the combined salary exceeds $136,000.00 later). Once the salaries are combined, that number is multiplied by the statutory percentage which is a function of how many children there are in the marriage. (The percentages are: 17% for one child; 25% for two; 29% for three; 31% for four; 35% for five or more however, the Court has discretion when setting the percentage for five or more children.) Once this number is determined, the amount of child support is then apportioned between the parents on a pro rata basis. Under the guideline, the only payment that is made is made by the noncustodial parent.

In the event that the combined salaries is greater than $136,000.00, the Court will use the same calculation but the Court will then decide whether an additional award based on the increased income available. All calculations, regardless of income will be based on the parties’ most recent tax return. The starting point is the gross income minus FICA. If the paying spouse is also required to pay maintenance, then maintenance is subtracted from the gross salary.

LEARNING POINT: While the guidelines are a helpful tool in figuring out child support, this is only the beginning. Add-ons, such as health care, college, child care and the such must also be factored in. Maintenance, if not permanent will change the amount paid in child support. If you are ordered to pay child support through twenty-one years of age, you may get credit for room and board fees you pay to a college which will lower your child support obligations. Seek out an attorney to assist you in determining the appropriate amount of child support.

child support attorney

What Is Maintenance and How Do I Get It?


divorce alimony temporary maintenanceA common question clients ask is how much alimony am I going to have to pay or can I expect to receive. The answer to that question is easy: none! Most people are familiar with the concept of alimony. Alimony was originally developed as a means of providing support for women after the termination of the marriage when, generally speaking, men controlled family property and opportunities in the work place for women were hard to come by. The amount of alimony awarded was supposed to be enough maintain the standard of living during the marriage and the award was usually permanent.

With the passage of the Equitable Distribution Law in 1980, alimony was eliminated. Maintenance replaced alimony and is now a gender neutral concept. Marriage is now viewed as an economic partnership, which in the event of a divorce, will not favor one spouse over the other. Maintenance can be described as payments to be made at fixed intervals from one spouse to the other as provided by a valid agreement or ordered by the Court. Maintenance is designed to rehabilitate the economically disadvantaged spouse with an eye towards economic independence.

When determining the duration and amount of maintenance, the Court will consider the following twelve factors: (1) the income and property of the respective parties including marital property distributed; (2) the duration of the marriage,the age and health of both parties; (3) the present and future earning capacity of both parties; (4) the ability of the party seeking maintenance to become self-supporting and if applicable, the period of time and training necessary therefor; (5) reduced or lost lifetime earning capacity of the party seeking maintenance as a result of having foregone or delayed education, training, employment, or career opportunities during the marriage; (6) the presence of children of marriage in the respective homes of the parties; (7) the tax consequences to each party; (8) contributions and services of the party seeking maintenance as a spouse, parent, wage earner and homemaker, and to the career or career potential of the other party; (9) the wasteful dissipation of marital property by either spouse; (10) any transfer or encumbrance made in contemplation of a matrimonial action without fair consideration; (11) the loss of health insurance benefits upon dissolution of the marriage; and (12) any other factor which the Court shall expressly find to be just and proper

Every case is fact specific. While no one factor may hold significant weight over the others, clearly the duration of the marriage and the ability of both parties to support themselves will be significant. If you were married for five years and both parties are doctors, maintenance will probably not be awarded. If you were married 25 years, you stayed home while your spouse was working, maintenance will probably be awarded. Duration of maintenance is up to the Court. Depending on the facts of your situation maintenance can last a year or for the rest of your life.

LEARNING POINT: Maintenance is a complicated matter with different variables which you and the Court must consider. If contemplating a divorce, call us for a free consultation and discussion regarding maintenance awards and other serious matters.

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